top-nwp-menu

Tag Archives | culture change

the essence of culture change

I’ve just come across this paragraph in Charles Landry’s excellent book The Art of City Making. Published in 2006, it is as fresh and relevant today as it was then: “Planning is about to be different from what it used to be – it is set to be a more holistic process. Soon the idea […]

Continue Reading

cutting down the paper overload

Well said, planning lawyer Stephen Ashworth! His call for the planning profession to cut down on paper overload in this week’s Planning magazine is a point well made. The argument that Stephen puts forward in his article is simple: Planning is overwhelmed by unnecessary information. Decisions are often delayed by the need to plough through […]

Continue Reading

scottish economic strategy | a new focus for community engagement

We now have a new suite of spending plans and national policy from the Scottish Government, focussed on the Scottish Budget Spending Review 2007 and the Government Economic Strategy. Planning has come of age again. Both documents recognise the twin contribution that planning has towards the Scottish Government’s ‘Purpose’ of sustainable economic growth – both […]

Continue Reading

Glasgow in 2057

What will Glasgow look like in 2057? The visions of budding young architects from Glasgow School of Art are offered at an exhibition this week, the culmination of an intensive 5 week project which, in the words of the course leader Fred Harvey, is “challenging 60 of the brightest young minds in one of the […]

Continue Reading

young planners

The Royal Town Planning Institute’s 2007 Young Planners Conference was held in Glasgow. Being chairman of Planning Aid for Scotland was apparently enough for the organisers to invite me to contribute a piece to a panel session entitled “Climate change: making a difference”. Taking a broad definition of climate, here’s what I talked about to […]

Continue Reading

“but the public can’t think strategically…”

A common refrain amongst the planning profession, even my more enlightened colleagues. But I believe this myth has no place in 21st century planning. Over the last five years, reforms to the statutory planning systems throughout the UK have put great emphasis on community engagement. This isn’t just about neighbour notification for planning applications, it […]

Continue Reading

Global Cities at the Tate Modern

The Global Cities exhibition at the Tate Modern proves that the public can be engaged in thorny questions of future planning strategy. It poses really big questions about the future of cities – diversity, community cohesion, density, coping with growth. Although it doesn’t suggest many answers, that doesn’t appear to be its objective. Just getting […]

Continue Reading

subscribe to new blogposts

Loading